2020–21 Summer Academic Engagement

We are wishing you a wonderful summer of rest and relaxation after a busy school year. We also recognize that students benefit over the summer months with essential and enriching learning opportunities. Please read below the plans we have put in place for students to stay engaged this summer.

  1. For Grades 4–12, we have claimed a specific book as “essential reading.” Accept the challenge of reading this text and ask yourself: What is essential about this text? Why is it important in my literacy journey and in the development of my personal “literary canon”
    (Essential texts are typically the launch point for engagement in English classes to begin the school year and are essential in terms of both reading and course preparation.)

  2. Select at least one other book from the grade-level list that we have curated for you. We have chosen texts that are the works of people with different backgrounds, voices, and perspectives. Use the brief one-line summary, or click on the Amazon link to read a few pages of each to see whether it matches your mood and your vocabulary. Some options beyond Amazon for purchasing or borrowing books include local independent bookstores, Convent & Stuart Hall’s digital library (tutorial for getting started), and San Francisco Public Library.

  3. Challenge yourself to make a personal book selection. Research, choose and read at least one book that is not on the curated list — find something to read that you source by yourself. Perhaps it is in an area you are passionate about — a historical period? Or a scientific discovery? A particular person? (If you want to select two books from the curated list, that is OK.)

  4. The combination of items #1, #2 and #3 means that the expectation is for each student to read at least three books this summer.

  5. Recognizing there are early readers in Lower Form, students in Grades K–3 are invited to explore reading resources as presented in the Lower Form letter by Ms. Karyn Wynn, Assistant Division Head for the Lower Form.

  6. Record your adventures in summer reading in a journal: include the date or time frame; the book’s title and author; your thoughts or reaction to the book; and add an illustration or other artwork if you are feeling visually creative. As the author Pamela Paul says in her book, My Life with Bob, this can be your “book of books,” and a reading journal can become a valuable personal artifact and “time capsule” of you and your reading. Use the journal to tell your reading story!

  7. Write too! The English faculty has come up with a series of great writing prompts. You could also include your responses to these prompts in your reading journal. Over the course of the summer, choose at least six different prompts from the list and have fun with those prompts. Students in the earlier grades can illustrate their response and dictate their written expression to a parent, older sibling or caregiver.

  8. There are additional summer academic expectations and opportunities in Modern and Classical Language, Mathematics and Science. You can find these below. 

  9. Another resource for your summer reading and learning is our Anti-Racism Resource List -- a list of developmentally appropriate (K–Adult) resources on Anti-Racism, and a chapter within our Cor Unum resources collection.

 

Lower Form Summer Engagement (Grades K–3)



Middle Form Summer Engagement (Grades 4–6)

Convent Elementary
English

Modern and Classical Language
Mathematics
Stuart Hall for Boys
English

Modern and Classical Language
Mathematics


Upper Form Summer Engagement (Grades 7 and 8)

Convent Elementary
English

Modern and Classical Language
History

Mathematics
Stuart Hall for Boys
English

Modern and Classical Language
History

Mathematics


High School Summer Engagement (Grades 9–12)

Convent High School
Studies in Literature & English Language

Modern and Classical Language

Mathematics
Science
Stuart Hall High School
Studies in Literature & English Language

Modern and Classical Language

Mathematics
Science