Local Filmmaker Joins Forces with Performing Arts Teacher for Music Video
Local Filmmaker Joins Forces with Performing Arts Teacher for Music Video

Performing Arts faculty and violinist Patrick Galvin SHB'03 stars in a short film shot in Convent & Stuart Hall's Syufy Theatre. 

Most music teachers at Convent & Stuart Hall also excel as performers. Patrick Galvin is no exception. A new short film shot on campus showcases his musical talent.    

Directed by San Francisco-based filmmaker, Timothy Gaensler-Debs, the film artfully cuts between shots of Patrick sitting in the audience mentally preparing for his performance and shots of him on stage playing J.S. Bach's masterpiece Preludio from the Partita in E major.  


The full film starring Patrick Galvin.

As a kindergarten student at Stuart Hall, Patrick took up the violin after a trip to the symphony. Patrick brings his experience from the finest training programs — the San Francisco Youth Symphony, the Peabody Conservatory, Prayner Konservatorium Vienna and the San Francisco Conservatory — to his teaching at Convent & Stuart Hall.

The following is an interview with Patrick Galvin, originally published in the 2018 Convent & Stuart Hall President's Report in an article highlighting the Performing Arts program.

What is your area of focus in the department and what drew you to Convent & Stuart Hall?
I teach coed fifth grade strings. I started teaching violin lessons at Convent & Stuart Hall in the Music Conservatory after school program three years ago. I'm glad to now be a part of the daytime Performing Arts staff.

What do you hope performing arts exposure will spark in your students?
There is nothing more enriching than exposure to and experience in the arts. The arts bring together intellect, intuition and personal expression. This benefits every student in our program regardless of how far they ultimately pursue music. I hope this exposure will spark a love of music and a curiosity to keep learning about the history of music.

What are your hopes for the department or your discipline in the next five years?
I really hope our department can meet or exceed one of President Krejcarek's goals, that of making ours the best elementary music program in the city. I think our recent meetings aimed at coordinating the different music curriculums have been a crucial first step in that direction.

How do you plan to expand and enhance the program for all students?
I was lucky to have excellent music teachers and professors my whole life. I find myself drawing upon many of the lessons of my teachers when preparing instruction for the students here. I hope to teach not only first-rate instrumental technique but to also impart a reverence for the history and research involved in being a great artist. Students shouldn't only be good players — they should be strong overall musicians, which involves knowing the background of one's instrument and repertoire, being able to read multiple clefs, singing, and of course good musical communication in a group setting.